SECURE

Summer Engagement in Cyber Undergraduate Research Experiences (SECURE)

This virtual initiative, called Summer Engagement in Cyber Undergraduate Research Experiences (SECURE), was established as a response to support students who may have lost summer internships and/or have financial hardships due to COVID-19. Several students of the program were NSF S-STEM scholars, a mix of computer engineering, cyber security engineering, electrical engineering and software engineering students.

Sixteen paid students were assigned to one of ten projects. Several students were classified as sophomores, and others were more advanced. Projects emphasized the development of educational experiences. Projects could have been development, education or design oriented; however, several projects revolved around cyber security. We introduced students to the research process, while adapting to the limitations of an online program. While our main goal was to support students and provide summer work, we also made progress on projects that were established before the program.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under awards DGE 1303279 and EEC 1565130. Any opinions, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.

Project descriptions and links to their respective posters are below.

Projects


Project 1: Lab environment to support the cyber security essentials project – Chris Horvatich, Melissa Hernandez

Mentor: Doug Jacobson

Hackerville is a fictitious village where the cyber family and their friends live. The village has numerous bad people that want to do harm to the family using the internet. The idea is that we can use hackerville.org to provide hands-on activities to allow them to experience cyber security attacks and defenses. This team will design and implement the various web sites needed to support the hands-on labs, develop curriculum materials (assignments, teacher guides, and assessments), and in some case create video stories to supplement the student leaning.

The goal of his project is to develop a web based environment to support teaching cyber security essentials.  We will develop two different types of lab assignments to support teaching security literacy. 

Click here to view the project poster.

Click here to watch the presentation of the project poster.


Project 2: IoT Security Project – Marcella Anderson, Muhamed Stilic

Mentor: Kristin Rozier (PhD Student Co-Advisor: Megan Ryan)

Contribute to an IoT security policy expedition. Goals of this project include contributing to the formal model of an IoT device, trying state-of-the-art tools for automatically checking that model for security holes, writing security requirements and contributing to a survey of relevant IoT security policies. Teams will set up experiments, instrument code, and write tests to see if the various award-winning tools can find flaws. We will have a mini tool competition to see which tool can perform the best security analysis and contribute to a precisely-defined, general security policy for IoT devices.

Click here to view the project poster.


Project 3: Remodeling CprE 185 for Safe and Virtual Learning – Darnesha Randle, Jacob Boicken

Mentor: Tom Daniels

Click here to view the project poster.

Click here to watch the presentation of the project poster.


Project 4: Freshman Engineering Hybrid Design Course – Samuel Estrada, Trent Moritz

Mentor: Mani Mina

This project focuses on using the Arduino platform for electronic prototyping. This platform could be used for non-engineers, such as industrial design students. This platform could also be used for high school students and other groups interested.

Click here to view the project poster.


Project 5: Mapping Machine Learning to Algorithms to Edge Nodes – Bishal Ghataney

Mentors: Henry Duwe, Akhilesh Tyagi

The goal of this project is to explore the mapping of machine learning algorithms to networks of extreme edge nodes (i.e. battery-less energy-harvesting nodes). The particular benchmarks and specifics can all be tailored to student interest. The frameworks (Tensorflow, GPU acceleration, TI Code Composer, etc.) and techniques used would be industry-standard and very transferable.

If interested, students are also able to contribute to developing machine learning hardware labs for CprE 482X: Hardware Design for Machine Learning.

Project poster will be linked here when made available.


Project 6: A Comparison of Platform Configurations for Robotics Development – Katherine Gisi, Maggie Heaslip

Mentors: Diane Rover, Phillip Jones

This project will explore new platforms for developing mobile robots and autonomous vehicle applications that could be used in courses, projects and/or outreach events such as IT-Adventures. Technologies like Raspberry Pi 4, Ubuntu version of Linux, Robot Operating System, robot simulators, smart cars and V2X connectivity will be considered.

Separately, we are interested in the online learning framework called PrairieLearn and how it can be used to develop online exercises and assessments to help students better engage with topics in the area of embedded systems.

Click here to view the project poster.


Project 7: FPGA-based Graphics Processor Lab Environment – Stephen Brooks

Mentor: Joe Zambreno

This project will help with prototyping the baseline design for updated laboratory exercises for CprE 480: Graphics Processing and Architecture. We will be mapping OpenGL 4.5 applications to a unified shader design implemented on the Digilent Nexsys-Video platform. The team will scaffold demos from Ethernet communication, framebuffer-based HDMI design, pixel processing, programmable vertex processing and shader core design. The team will also work on the OpenGL software side, supporting utilities and mapper functions.

Click here to view the project poster.

Click here to listen the presentation of the project poster.


Project 8: Creating an Innovation Learning Experience with Design Thinking and Innovation Heuristics – Stuart Pearson

Mentor: Nick Fila

This project will apply a design thinking process to define a problem of interest to students in relation to course design or virtual instruction. Students will generate ideas, develop prototypes and test prototypes in collaboration with faculty.

Click here to view the project poster.

Click here to watch the presentation of the project poster.


Project 9: Development of High School Cyber Defense Competition Curriculum – Jacob Moody, Nate Tucker

Mentor: Doug Jacobson

Click here to view the project poster.


Project 10: Draftback for GITLAB – Daniel Han

Mentor: Simanta Mitra

Draftback lets you play back all the changes made to a document over time. The goal of this project is to design and implement an app to provide draftback-like features for GIT.

Project poster will be linked here when made available.